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Saturday, January 22, 2011

"Greatest hits of the '60s, '70s, and now the '80s"

This is the new tagline of the Boston oldies station, at least since the new year. There are two problems with this change. First, I happen to like the greatest hits of the '50s and want them back. Second, I was alive in the '80s. Oldies have always been an expressly historical genre, representing pop music that happened before I existed and thus was of interest to me for purely antiquarian reasons. (I mean, it's hard to explain how I was an antiquarian at age six, when I first started listening to the radio, but suffice it to say, I was.) Now, oldies and I have apparently converged. History has fused with the present! What outrage is next? My present will be the present's past? Oldies will represent my personal nostalgia instead of the nostalgia of old people? I WILL BE OLD???

Unacceptable.

4 comments:

FLG said...

I had a similar realization about 10 years ago.

Recently, however, songs that I liked in high school by Pearl Jam, Nirvana, etc, started appearing in the classic rock rotation. That really freaked me out.

profmondo said...

But at my back I always hear/ "I Love the 80s" drawing near...

arethusa said...

It's also a bad moment when movies you saw in the theater on their first release start appearing on Turner Classic Movies.

Oh, and academia is NOT a profession that will help you feel young longer, since the students stay the same age and you don't. Just warning you.

Jacob T. Levy said...

Oh, and academia is NOT a profession that will help you feel young longer, since the students stay the same age and you don't.

"Word," as I believe the youngsters used to say.