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Friday, March 01, 2013

Mergers and acquisitions

Q: What would my blog look like if it was Athens and Jerusalem merged with What Would Phoebe Do
A: Many short posts about nail polish shades.

In that spirit, I have, with significant lag time, followed Phoebe's lead and acquired bubblegum pink nail polish, though my hunt for it was much briefer and spanned fewer continents, but I'm sure the result will also peel and chip sooner.

15 comments:

Withywindle said...

What Would Powell Do.

Quantity, Haste, Brevity, Quality, in that order of priority. Revision? Pshaw.

Miss Self-Important said...

Don't forget obscurity. I think you've written more on Powell on your blog than anyone will bother to write about him again for the next century. If Phoebe were more forthcoming with 19th C. French-Jewish deets, it would be a mutual obscurity.

Andrew Stevens said...

Enoch Powell is obscure in the U.S. He was a hugely significant figure in U.K. politics. In 2002, 30 years after his political peak, the British public voted him 55th in the BBC's 100 Greatest Britons of all-time, right under Robert Falcon Scott and right above Cliff Richard, two behind T.E. Lawrence, and two ahead of Alexander Graham Bell. It's true that 95% (or more) of Americans have never heard of him, but his name recognition in the U.K. is probably still close to 100%.

Miss Self-Important said...

Yes, I saw that tidbit on his Wikipedia page too when I looked him up after Withy's stream of posts. So I think my teasing stands?

Andrew Stevens said...

If you amended it to "than anyone American will bother to write about him again for the next century," then sure. I confess I was actually a little astonished when I read some excerpts from Withywindle's posts to my wife only to discover she had never heard of Enoch Powell and the "Rivers of Blood" speech. It still regularly comes up in U.K. political discussions (e.g. in the controversy over Nick Griffin's appearance on Question Time back in 2009, I must have heard it referenced a dozen times or more), so I had probably fooled myself that he was a more well-known figure than he is internationally.

I wonder if, say, Barry Goldwater is as obscure in the U.K. or does America's cultural behemothry make that impossible?

Andrew Stevens said...

I asked some British friends and the consensus seems to be "Yes, Barry Goldwater is equally obscure." Apparently, if he hadn't been name-checked in a Bob Dylan song, nobody would have heard of him.

Withywindle said...

I am a force of light, making the present clearer and more habitable.

Miss Self-Important said...

AS: Well, I can't edit comments, but if it assuages your concerns, let's say, "anyone American."

Withy: As an historian, or as a blogger? I'm not sure that blogs count among the shedders of light into darkness.

Withywindle said...

"Public intellectual/natterer."

Alpheus said...

An admittedly parochial point: to classicists (even American classicists), Powell isn't obscure. His books on Herodotus have to be included in any serious bibliography of that author, and he's one of the editors of the Oxford text of Thucydides. I'd read some of his scholarship before I ever heard of his political career.

Phoebe said...

1) Which shade/brand?

2) You don't actually want dissertation-blogging, do you? I mean 'you' in the general sense.

Miss Self-Important said...

Withywindle: Public intellectuals almost always shade things over again. Natterers are neutral.

Alpheus: Goodness. "Anyone American who is not a classicist," then. But I did take a grad seminar on Herodotus in the classics dept, and recall no mention of this Powell character. This may not be broadly indicative though, b/c the prof was primarily interested in the bibliographical contributions which he himself had authored.

Phoebe: An Essie shade which, when applied, turned out a bit more Barbie pink than the more subdued expectation of bubblegum pink, but still acceptable to me. This was following the discovery that you can buy previous seasons' nail polish lines for half price on Amazon. Even Butter, but the selection of that is small and does not yet include holographic shades.

I in the particular sense don't mind dissertation blogging; your topic is reasonably close to mine (at least, not the difference b/w neuroscience and political theory). But I imagine those who read your blog for thoughts on women in advice columns would be less pleased.

Phoebe said...

Well, then, you may be in luck - it's dissertation overdrive season now, so you-the-interested as well as you-the-uninterested will probably be subjected to copious amounts of the stuff.

Alpheus said...

I did take a grad seminar on Herodotus in the classics dept, and recall no mention of this Powell character. This may not be broadly indicative though, b/c the prof was primarily interested in the bibliographical contributions which he himself had authored.

So curious to know who this was. Based on your brief description, I'm inclined to think his name may have rhymed with corsage...?

Miss Self-Important said...

It may have.