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Friday, October 13, 2017

Bleg

The best economic histories of the United States, especially of the early republic and Civil War periods, but also later if really good? Particularly useful would be histories of central banking, tariffs, other federal government interventions.

9 comments:

Lance Lancerson said...

Empire of Wealth, by John Steele Gordon. I think I read some of it, and if I did, it was good.

Miss Self-Important said...

Thank you! Ordered.

Alex said...

Off-topic, but I'm curious if you have any thoughts on this article about meritocracy:

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/10/17/author-discusses-how-racism-perpetuated-elite-colleges

Apparently even diverse environments reinforce the notion of meritocracy. This is, of course, A Problem, in the eyes of some.

Miss Self-Important said...

I don't know, does it seem to you like this article is very badly-written or poorly-edited and hard to follow? I'm not sure I really understand this person's argument, but it seems like: people who go to selective colleges don't graduate believing my arguments about the causes of inequality and instead believe the more widely-held view that success is the result of individual hard work and talent. The reason for this error is that university diversity programming focuses too much on diversity instead of inclusion. We need to make cross-racial interactions better even though students of all races tend to believe the wrong arguments about inequality so that interacting more with them will continue to reinforce this wrong opinion I want to undermine? This is just incoherent.

Alex said...

Yeah, pretty much. I just find it frustratingly unsurprising that such muddled thinking around meritocracy and diversity is deemed worthy if a write-up.

Though I suppose that favoring less muddled thinking would be reinforcing the idea of meritocracy, which it is obligatory to eschew.

Anonymous said...

Chernow's bio of Hamilton

Anonymous said...

The Great Tax Wars by Steven R. Weisman

In general, I would say go to Marginal Revolution and ask him.

Anonymous said...

Taxation in Colonial America by Alvin Rabushka

Andrew Stevens said...

Sadly, economic histories post-Civil War are much better and easier to come by than pre-Civil War. You're dealing without a lot of data we take for granted when you're going that far back.